Saturday, June 03, 2017

Hidden Treasure: The Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theatre

The first of an upcoming series of Joel’s overlooked personal favorite places, events and other things that should be better known.

What is it?

A palatial movie theater.

Where is it hidden?

In Jersey City, New Jersey.

Why is it a treasure?

The screen is huuuge.  Like, very huge.  That-aquatic-dinosaur-in-Jurassic World-that-dwarfs-a-whale huge.  While some IMAX and similar screens may be larger, the sheer feeling of an entire building devoted to one humongous screen is like nowhere else.

Popcorn and drinks are a dollar each. With tickets usually going for $8 (less for double or triple features!), there’s no better value for a dropped Hamilton.

The building is unique and historic.
It dates back to 1929!  Built just before the stock market crash, the last pre-Great Derpession moment when lavish building for a mass audience was economically feasible, it maintains much of its original style.  Much of the facade still needs fixing up from decades of disrepair, but the core functions of a theater are fully operational, and the twist on the original grandeur makes it perfect for an Addams family reunion (which actually was a theme this past Halloween!)

How did I find it?

I knew about it for a while (I’d sometimes seen flyers for its upcoming screenings at NYC theaters such as Film Forum), but it was the closing of Manhattan’s Ziegfeld theater in early 2016 that spurred me to check it out.

Why is it hidden?
It’s a little out of the way of the NYC-focused revival theater circuit, and not as hip as the Alamo Drafthouse theaters in Yonkers and Brooklyn.  As a non-commercial theater, it doesn’t do current releases or have big marketing campaigns.  (Then again, the Ziegfeld was neglected when it was run like a typical big-chain commercial theater in its later years.)

And unfortunately, it lacks a working air conditioning system, so it has to take a summer break during peak moviegoing season.

What is the path to the treasure? Well, literally a PATH, since it’s across the street from the Journal Square PATH station.  “JSQ” is part of a subway line (though not part of the “NYC subway” system, another reason it’s quasi-“hidden”) that bridges New Jersey and Manhattan and connects to various transit systems.


There is one last movie screening tonight before the summer break — The Red Shoes at 7PM — and the building will be open for the JCArts Annual Year-End Gallery Show.

Thursday, June 01, 2017

Is this thing still on?

It's been a while.

This blog was never updated on a daily basis even in its early heyday, but it trailed off in a major way.  Some of this is due to Twitter and then Facebook, and my attempted clean break to Wordpress was unsuccessful in starting new momentum where the old had stopped.

But I've been craving a return to the old-school blogosphere from the maelstrom of gossip and trivia and venting that is social media.  That's where everyone seems to be nowadays, but some of my fellow bloggers who started around the time I did, like Tom Knapp, have kept at personal blogging with a regular if relatively small readership, so it can be done.

And I was sick through most of May, so any attempt at doing a whole month of writing would have to wait.

So in a new month, here I am.  Are you?

Wednesday, February 01, 2017

MeTryWriMo

My challenge to myself this month: how much can I write, including but not limited to this blog, in the shortest month of the year?

Friday, September 30, 2016

happy 100th, centenarian mathematician Richard K. Guy!

Some mathematicians die young, like Galois, Abel, or Zhitomirskiy. Others are active well into their 90s, like Bertrand Russell, Martin Gardner or Richard K. Guy, the last of which turns 100 today.  I recently remembered an article a couple years back about him walking over 800 steps to the top of a tower every year, and looking it up shows that he did it this year:


From the The Strong Law of Small Numbers to the glider in the game of life, Guy's discoveries (and compilation of the undiscovered, in Unsolved Problems in Number Theory) will be leading to new mathematics in 2116.  Happy birthday, Richard K. Guy!

Wednesday, April 06, 2016

newspaper roundup

On April 1, my op-ed "The race is on: Uber versus the real sharing economy" ran in the newspaper Jamaica Observer.  And no, that's not an April Fools joke.

In fact, the piece was written all the way back in February, a month in which it appeared in print in both The Des Moines Register (not online, except behind the paywalls of the paper's subscriber archive and the ProQuest academic database) and La Tribuna Hispana (in that paper's own Spanish translation!).  The same month, two of my letters to the editor also appeared in newsprint: "Tests and time" in Queens Chronicle and "Jews Onscreen" in The Jewish Week.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Monday, September 28, 2015

Worst Blu-ray cover ever: National Lampoon's Vacation.

There are plenty of terrible Blu-ray covers out there, but none of them can quite match the one for National Lampoon's Vacation.
The theatrical poster had a badass illustration by Boris Vallejo in the style of his own sword-and-sorcery book covers:
Then, the DVD cover used what I would have bet my life was the crappiest possible Chevy Chase photo on it:
Luckily I didn't make that bet, because the Blu-ray cover achieved the Herculean feat of using an even crappier Chevy Chase photo.  Feast your eyes on this: